Lawyer for George Floyd Family Reveals Danger Behind Removing Confederate Statues | Beaufort County Now | In the wake of the death of George Floyd, who died in police custody in Minneapolis, Minnesota last month, there has been a massive spike in statues to historical figures who have been dubbed “offensive” by the left being torn down. | lifezette, lawyer, george floyd, removing confederate statues, june 22, 2020

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Lawyer for George Floyd Family Reveals Danger Behind Removing Confederate Statues

Publisher's note: This post appears here courtesy of the LifeZette, and written by Polizette Staff.

    In the wake of the death of George Floyd, who died in police custody in Minneapolis, Minnesota last month, there has been a massive spike in statues to historical figures who have been dubbed "offensive" by the left being torn down. Now, a prominent civil rights attorney who is representing the Floyd family is speaking out to reveal why removing these statues could be a very bad idea.

    Ben Crump is an experienced civil rights lawyer who has represented the families of people like Trayvon Martin, Michael Brown Jr., Tamir Rice, Ahmaud Arbery, and Breonna Taylor. He is currently representing the Floyd family, but to the surprise of many, he doesn't think removing statues to historical figures is such a good idea, even when they are meant to honor confederates.

    "I think we have to figure out how to honor people who have done things that are beneficial to society, and if they did things that were not beneficial to society, that we can examine in the lens of having a broad view of what we believe as Americans represents the best attributes of our national identity, then we should look at that," Crump told Fox News host Neil Cavuto on Saturday.

    "Whether it should be a situation where, if we keep statues up like that, we tell the history of that individual so people will know the whole story," Crump added. "I'm not sure pulling the statues down is the right thing if we now don't get the lessons to understand how we can learn from those things, so we don't repeat those mistakes of the past. You know, they say history - if not studied - we will often repeat it."

    Crump also addressed the death of Rayshard Brooks, who died in a police-related shooting in Atlanta, Georgia earlier this month.

    "These are very contentious times when it comes to the whole issue of police use of force," Crump explained. "I think ... we should all try to make sure that we examine all the attendant circumstances. I hope that's what the district attorney did, because I've always advocated that we have to have due process of the law for everybody and that we want to have the fair administration of justice for all involved, and what I have found is that normally, the police are going to be given every benefit of the doubt, every benefit of consideration."

    "The thing that I have found is that citizens of color are not always given that same due process, and so I think it should be fair for everybody," he added. "It should be fair for police officers just as much as I believe it should be fair for citizens whether they are black people, white people, brown people or red people. We have to make sure that when we quote Thomas Jefferson's words that all are created equally that we honor those words in America by saying we want equal consideration and equal justice under the law for all Americans."


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