Despite Cooper Win, Republicans Appear To Keep 6-4 Majority of Council of State | Beaufort County Now | The races for seats on the N.C. Council of State were as close as polls predicted. They defined what pollsters call toss-ups, all teetering close to the margin of error. | carolina journal, governor, roy cooper, republicans, majority, council of state, november 4, 2020

Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19)

Despite Cooper Win, Republicans Appear To Keep 6-4 Majority of Council of State

Publisher's Note: This post appears here courtesy of the Carolina Journal. The author of this post is John Trump.

    The races for seats on the N.C. Council of State were as close as polls predicted. They defined what pollsters call toss-ups, all teetering close to the margin of error.

    Still, Republicans maintained the status quo, with a 6-4 majority of the statewide elected executive branch officers. Incumbents kept their seats, according to unofficial results as of 11:30 p.m. election night. Open seats for lieutenant governor, state superintendent, and labor commissioner stayed under GOP control.

    The governor, too, remains the same.

    Roy Cooper, the Democrat, beat challenger, Lt. Gov. Dan Forest, as predicted, by about 241,000 votes.

    "After all is said and done, the names will change while the parties will maintain control of the Council of State positions they hold today," said Mitch Kokai, political analyst at the John Locke Foundation.

    "Incumbents win, while the council welcomes three new Republicans. That has to mean good news for the GOP. Mark Robinson, Catherine Truitt, and Josh Dobson will bring fresh ideas to state government."

    Governor

  • Roy Cooper, Democrat (I) — 51%
  • Dan Forest, Republican — 47%
  • Al Pisano, Constitution — 1%
  • Steven J. DiFiore, Libertarian — 0.37%

    Lieutenant governor

  • Mark Robinson, Republican — 52%
  • Yvonne Lewis Holley, Democrat — 48%

    Attorney General

  • Josh Stein, Democrat (I) — 50.1%
  • Jim O'Neill, Republican — 49.9%

    Auditor

  • Beth A. Wood, Democrat (I) — 51%
  • Anthony Wayne (Tony) Street, Republican — 49%

    Commissioner of Agriculture

  • Steve Troxler, Republican (I) — 54%
  • Jenna Wadsworth, Democrat — 46%

    Commissioner of Insurance

  • Mike Causey, Republican (I) — 52%
  • Wayne Goodwin, Democrat — 48%

    Commissioner of Labor

  • Josh Dobson, Republican — 51%
  • Jessica Holmes — 49%

    Secretary of State

  • Elaine Marshall, Democrat (I) — 51%
  • E.C. Sykes, Republican — 49%

    Superintendent of Public Instruction

  • Catherine Truitt, Republican — 51%
  • Jen Mangrum, Democrat — 49%

    Treasurer

  • Dale Folwell, Republican, (I) — 53%
  • Ronnie Chatterji, Democrat — 47%



HbAD0

Latest Op-Ed & Politics

Wonder if this is a cultural thing...about attitudes toward women?
A bill introduced in Kentucky this week would “add false reporting of claims of abuse towards another party or de facto custodian to the list of factors a court shall consider when making a custody determination.”
Let's be frank.... a lot of us have been leery of Facebook and its cabal of programmers, administrators, promoters, fact-checkers, and even its creator, and many have even walked away from the liberal platform.
Governor Roy Cooper signed the following bill into law: House Bill 4
An analysis from Reason magazine finds that there is a significant variation in per-capita state and local aid contained in the latest Covid relief bill being debated on Capitol Hill.

HbAD1

With new U.S. Census data not expected until September, the State Board of Elections is recommending moving all of this year’s municipal elections to 2022.
Though it is well-established and easy to see by the plain language of the statute and the settlement, Bell strongly declared at the end of her testimony that the collusive settlement “did not change the law."
We will offer this allotment of three with more to come; some old, most new, but all quite informative, and, moreover, necessary to understanding that in North Carolina, there is a wiser path to govern ourselves and our People.
Private bars will open at limited capacity under a new executive decree from the governor, although at the same time he called for more direct government aid to prop up failing businesses.
Vanita Gupta openly advocates to “end the use of police in schools as a solution to student discipline.”

HbAD2

Naomi Lim of the Washington Examiner highlights the slow progress of President Joe Biden in filling Cabinet-level positions.

HbAD3

 
Back to Top