Record pay Increase likely coming for Disabled Veterans and Military Retirees in 2023 | Eastern North Carolina Now | Schryer: I'll believe it when I see it in my bank account.

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Military.com is reporting:

Veterans receiving disability pay from the Department of Veterans Affairs and military retirees will likely get record monthly check increases for 2023 thanks to the pace of inflation, according to a new estimate.

The annual VA disability pay and military retirement cost-of-living pay adjustment, known as COLA, is typically tied to the Social Security rate change, which will likely be announced in October. An early projection based on national inflation data by The Senior Citizens League (TSCL), a nonpartisan senior advocacy nonprofit, estimates rates will rise by 8.7%. 

That’s slightly lower than the 9.6% estimate made by officials at that organization in August. Estimates are based on year-to-date data released by the Department of Labor.

Read Next: Sweeping New Law Expands Veterans' Medical and Disability Benefits

Despite the slight estimate dip, the increase would still be the highest veterans and seniors have seen since 1981, when it went up 11.2% in response to inflation at the time, according to a TSCL press release. 

If the 8.7% materializes for 2023, military retirees would see an average increase of more than $219 in their monthly retirement checks. Veterans receiving disability compensation from the VA also would see their monthly disability payments increase, with the average monthly amount going up by more than $136.

The VA says nearly 5.2 million veterans receive disability compensation, with an annual benefit of $18,858 as of 2021. According to the Defense Department, there are around 1.87 million military retirees, who had an annual average retirement payment of $30,265 in 2020, the most recent year for which data was readily available.  

The annual Social Security COLA increase is based on the Consumer Price Index (CPI), which is measured by the Department of Labor. The department takes a snapshot of the costs of a select group of goods and services and compares those costs to the previous year. If there is an increase, retirees and many others receiving government benefits see a bump in their monthly payments for the upcoming year. If those costs go down, the government payments will remain the same in the upcoming year.

TSCL's estimate is based on the CPI through July. But with several months left to go, the ultimate increase could vary slightly from the projection. For example, if inflation continues to increase, the COLA raise could be as high as 10.01%, they said. If inflation falls below the recent average, the increase could dip.

The anticipated record increase would be the second year running of such bumps. For 2022, the raise was 5.9%, which followed an average 1.5% increase over the 10 years prior.

Editor’s Note: This story was updated Sept. 23, 2022, after new estimates for the upcoming disability and military retirement compensation were released by The Senior Citizens League, which showed slightly lower projected increases.

-- Amy Bushatz can be reached at amy.bushatz@military.com.

Related: 2022 Military Pay Charts


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