Blueprints for Reform | Beaufort County Now | Our Blueprints for Reform provide recommendations and solutions ready for implementation. | james g. martin center, blueprints for reform, recommendations, university system, december 15, 2020

Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19)

Blueprints for Reform

Publisher's Note: This post appears here courtesy of The James G. Martin Center. The author of this post is Martin Center Staff.

    The university system in the United States has accomplished a great deal of good, but it has strayed from its chief goals of scholarly inquiry and responsible teaching, especially in the past 20 years.

    All too often, universities allow teaching to become shallow and trendy, failing to challenge students intellectually and disparaging traditional principles of justice, ethics, and liberal education. Students know little about the history of their country or the institutions that led to this nation's freedom and prosperity. Students can get by without taking rigorous courses; non-academic activities overshadow scholarship. As a result, many college graduates have poor skills in computation, communication, and logical analysis. Faculty are allowed excessive latitude in what they teach — and often get away with little teaching at all — because research is emphasized.

    Taxpayers as well as students and their families pay hefty prices to support a system that often provides too little educational value. Across the country, states spend roughly $100 billion per year on higher education — more than 12 percent of total state expenditures. Despite this tremendous cost, colleges and universities have failed to provide value to students, taxpayers, and society. The average 6-year graduation rate at public universities is just 54 percent.

    State legislators and university trustees have an opportunity to address many of these issues. The Martin Center's "Blueprints for Reform" provide detailed plans of how to do so.

    Our Blueprints for Reform provide recommendations and solutions ready for implementation. They include specific proposals, model university policies, and model legislation from public policy organizations and states that have already introduced successful reforms.

    Each Blueprint focuses on a single topic. Check back frequently to find out if new Blueprints have been released. And if there is a topic you think we should cover, send an email to info@jamesgmartin.center and we'll add it to our list.

    Published Blueprints:

    Blueprint for Reform: Trigger Warnings
    Blueprint for Reform: Freedom of Association
    Blueprint for Reform: Due Process on Campus
    Blueprint for Reform: Free Speech
    Blueprint for Reform: Institutional Neutrality
    Blueprint for Reform: Viewpoint Diversity


HbAD0

Latest Op-Ed & Politics

Wonder if this is a cultural thing...about attitudes toward women?
A bill introduced in Kentucky this week would “add false reporting of claims of abuse towards another party or de facto custodian to the list of factors a court shall consider when making a custody determination.”
Let's be frank.... a lot of us have been leery of Facebook and its cabal of programmers, administrators, promoters, fact-checkers, and even its creator, and many have even walked away from the liberal platform.
Governor Roy Cooper signed the following bill into law: House Bill 4
An analysis from Reason magazine finds that there is a significant variation in per-capita state and local aid contained in the latest Covid relief bill being debated on Capitol Hill.
With new U.S. Census data not expected until September, the State Board of Elections is recommending moving all of this year’s municipal elections to 2022.
Though it is well-established and easy to see by the plain language of the statute and the settlement, Bell strongly declared at the end of her testimony that the collusive settlement “did not change the law."
We will offer this allotment of three with more to come; some old, most new, but all quite informative, and, moreover, necessary to understanding that in North Carolina, there is a wiser path to govern ourselves and our People.

HbAD1

Private bars will open at limited capacity under a new executive decree from the governor, although at the same time he called for more direct government aid to prop up failing businesses.
Vanita Gupta openly advocates to “end the use of police in schools as a solution to student discipline.”
Naomi Lim of the Washington Examiner highlights the slow progress of President Joe Biden in filling Cabinet-level positions.
Rachel Bovard writes for the Federalist about an inconvenient set of facts for a social media giant.
Judicial Watch announced today it asked Facebook’s Oversight Board to end the censorship of former President Trump and allow him back onto the platform.
Legislation introduced by Republican lawmakers would mandate recipients of unemployment benefits actively search for work, a requirement that hasn’t been in place since the pandemic began in March.

HbAD2

 
Back to Top