"Every Picture Tells a Story ... Don't It:" On the Road - The Colorful Shenandoah, Chapter III | Beaufort County Now | Shenandoah National Park, with the 105 mile long Skyline Drive bisecting it from southwest to northeast along its spine, is a rugged natural park running from Front Royal to the North to Rockfish Gap to the South.

Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19)
   Publisher's note: This a continuation of "Every Picture Tells a Story ... Don't It:" On the Road - The Colorful Shenandoah, Chapter II. It was a very good trip, with plenty of material to share.

    Shenandoah National Park, with the 105 mile long Skyline Drive bisecting it from southwest to northeast along its spine, is a rugged natural park running from Front Royal to the North to Rockfish Gap to the South. Along the winding, smooth surfaced road that undulates through Blue Ridge Mountain Range, there are 75 overlooks, handsomely appointed with low stone walls, and large spreading oaks and ash.
It was an inauspicious Fall foliage season - too dry in the early Summer, too wet in the late summer. Regardless, the colors were muted, but lovely. These pictures were made in the Rockingham County sector of the Skyline Drive: Above and below.     photos by Stan Deatherage

On this Saturday, at every overlook north of the Swift Gap Entrance, there were motorists motored about by many and various vehicles: Above. The views were spectacular even if the colors were not of a brilliant hue: Below.     photos by Stan Deatherage

    We visited the Shenandoah National Park, near the end of the Fall foliage season, and our first amazement was the vast number of people on Skyline drive. When we entered the Park at Swift Creek Gap, we headed north to see how we could travel before the imminent darkness of a dying day. We made it as far as Big Meadows in the proximity of Byrd Visitor Center, where we eventually made our way to Lewis Falls.
Click here to enlarge to a full map of the Shenandoah National Park.

When one makes an interesting picture, it is always helpful to have an interesting subject in the foreground: Above. I am particularly partial to the subject in this image: Below.     photos by Stan Deatherage

    We will eventually get to the pictures of the trail to Lewis Falls, but first we shall take a gander at some of the panoramic views along Skyline Drive. As I mentioned we were not alone, and now you are with me too.
People and cars everywhere, and in the middle of a wilderness at that. Sometimes one must devise a way to separate themselves from the maddening hordes: above. Why? Mostly so you can get pictures like this, and some of the others: Below.     photos by Stan Deatherage


Go Back
HbAD0

 
Back to Top