COVID-19 and an Unexpected Hospital Crisis | Beaufort County Now

Rich Lowry of National Review Online explores the COVID-19 pandemic’s unexpected impact on American hospitals. john locke foundation, coronavirus, covid-19, hospital crisis, national review, pandemic, april 29, 2020
Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19)

COVID-19 and an Unexpected Hospital Crisis

Publisher's note: The author of this post is Mitch Kokai for the John Locke Foundation.

    Rich Lowry of National Review Online explores the COVID-19 pandemic's unexpected impact on American hospitals.

  • We had to destroy the hospitals to save them.
  • You could be forgiven for thinking that's the upshot of the coronavirus lockdowns that have suspended elective surgeries and generally discouraged people from going to hospitals.
  • Many hospitals are getting pushed near, or over, the financial edge. At a time when we feared that hospitals would get overwhelmed by a surge of patients, they have instead been emptied out. At a time when we thought medical personnel would be at a premium, they are instead being idled all over the country.
  • We are experiencing an epidemic that bizarrely - and in part because of the choices of policymakers - has created a surfeit of hospital beds and an excess of doctors and nurses.
  • Not everywhere, of course. Hospitals in New York City and parts of New Jersey have been tested to their limits. But throughout much of the country, hospitals are drastically underutilized, both because states have banned elective procedures and people have been too afraid to show up.
  • One reason that we didn't want hospitals to get overrun by COVID-19 patients is that we didn't want to crowd out everyone else needing care. But, as a deliberate choice, we've ended up crowding out many people needing care - even where COVID-19 surges haven't happened and probably never will.
  • Drastic measures were called for when the coronavirus hit our shores and began to spread out of control. ... It is understandable that we wanted hospitals to prepare for the worst, and to preserve and muster equipment necessary to safely care for infected people. ...
  • ... But this is a case where the cure may be really worse than the disease - or at least has created its own crisis.

    Follow Carolina Journal Online's continuing coverage of the COVID-19 pandemic HERE.

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