CDC, FDA Call to Immediately Pause Johnson & Johnson COVID Vaccine Over Rare Blood Clotting Concerns | Beaufort County Now | The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) announced Tuesday morning that they are recommending a pause in the administration of the Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccine out of an “abundance of caution.”

Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19)
Publisher's Note: This post appears here courtesy of the The Daily Wire. The author of this post is Amanda Prestigiacomo.

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) announced Tuesday morning that they are recommending a pause in the administration of the Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccine out of an "abundance of caution."

    According to released statements, officials are examining whether the vaccine was linked to six cases in the U.S. "of a rare & severe type of blood clot." The one-shot Johnson & Johnson vaccine has been administered more than 6.8 million times across the country.

    "Today FDA and @CDCgov issued a statement regarding the Johnson & Johnson #COVID19 vaccine. We are recommending a pause in the use of this vaccine out of an abundance of caution," started a Twitter thread from the FDA.

    Each of the six cases occurred in a person between six and 13 days after they had received the vaccine. The cases will be reviewed by the CDC on Wednesday; the FDA will review the analysis and investigate the cases, too.

    Johnson & Johnson said in a statement: "We are aware that thromboembolic events including those with thrombocytopenia have been reported with Covid-19 vaccines. At present, no clear causal relationship has been established between these rare events and the Janssen Covid-19 vaccine."

    According to The New York Times, all six of those with the adverse reaction were females between the ages of 18 and 48. "One woman died and a second woman in Nebraska has been hospitalized in critical condition," the report said.

    "While the move was framed as a recommendation to health practitioners in the states, the federal government is expected to pause administration of the vaccine at all federally run vaccination sites," the Times reported. "Federal officials expect that state health officials will take that as a strong signal to do the same. Within two hours of the announcement, Gov. Mike DeWine of Ohio, a Republican, advised all health providers in his state to temporarily stop giving Johnson & Johnson shots."

    "As of [April 12], 6.8m+ doses of the J&J vaccine have been administered in the U.S. CDC & FDA are reviewing data involving 6 reported U.S. cases of a rare & severe type of blood clot in individuals after receiving the vaccine. Right now, these adverse events appear to be extremely rare," the FDA Twitter thread continued.

    "Treatment of this specific type of blood clot is different from the treatment that might typically be administered," the FDA said. "CDC will convene a meeting of the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) on Wednesday to further review these cases and assess their potential significance. FDA will review that analysis as it also investigates these cases."

    "Until that process is complete, we are recommending this pause," the FDA announced. "This is important to ensure that the health care provider community is aware of the potential for these adverse events and can plan due to the unique treatment required with this type of blood clot."

    The agency closed the thread, "#COVID19 vaccine safety is a top priority for the federal government, and we take all reports of health problems following COVID-19 vaccination very seriously."

    Similarly, in a joint statement from the FDA's Dr. Peter Marks and Dr. Anne Schuchat of the CDC, the agencies announced Tuesday, "We are recommending a pause in the use of this vaccine out of an abundance of caution. Right now, these adverse events appear to be extremely rare."
Go Back

HbAD0

Latest Op-Ed & Politics

Voters in Robbinsville, a tiny town in North Carolina’s last dry county, have approved the sale of beer and wine, according to unofficial results Tuesday.
The White House was forced to intervene Friday and walk back claims President Joe Biden made during a town hall event on Thursday night, admitting that the administration is “not pursuing” using the National Guard to solve the supply chain crisis
Let's be frank ... a lot of us have been leery of Facebook and its cabal of programmers, administrators, promoters, fact-checkers, and even its creator, and many have even walked away from the liberal platform.
We will offer this allotment of three with more to come; some old, most new, but all quite informative, and, moreover, necessary to understanding that in North Carolina, there is a wiser path to govern ourselves and our People.
In a previous research brief, I wrote about how existing nuclear power plants produce “zero emissions while at the same time being the most reliable and lowest-cost source of electricity.”
We have reached a critical juncture in our nation’s history. As once hallowed institutions decay before our eyes, parallel structures struggle to arise.

HbAD1

On Tuesday, November 2, The N.C. House voted along party lines in favor of its new House election district map, while the N.C. Senate approved new congressional maps.
No longer the "friendly opposition", the Liberal "ying" to the more studious, more insightful "yang"; no, not the least bit worthy of such.
After the horrific brutality in Waukesha, Wisconsin, in which a man rammed his SUV into marchers in a Christmas parade, causing the deaths of at least six people, including a small child and injuries to scores of others, many media outlets eschewed calling what happened an attack.
Gov. Roy Cooper, a Democrat, has vetoed a bill to limit his powers as a governor, as well as the power of his successors.
In every state studied! Rare such research is so profound. Our education system lied to us.
The reasoning behind the bill, as laid out in the bill’s language, is that “too many North Carolina citizens have no or inadequate savings for retirement.”

HbAD2

 
Back to Top